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Angry worshippers lash out against Trump across Muslim world

KARIN LAUB and ILAN BEN ZION

Large crowds of worshippers across the Muslim world staged anti-U.S. marches Friday, some stomping on posters of Donald Trump or burning American flags in the largest outpouring of anger yet at the U.S. president's recognition of bitterly contested Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

In the holy city itself, prayers at Islam's third-holiest site dispersed largely without incident, but Palestinians clashed with Israeli troops in several dozen West Bank hotspots and on the border with the Gaza Strip.

Israeli warplanes struck Hamas military targets in the Gaza Strip Friday in response to a rocket fired from the zone that Israel's military said was intercepted by its Iron Dome missile-defense system.

The Palestinian health ministry said at least 15 people were injured in Friday's air strikes.

Earlier, a 30-year-old Gaza man was killed by Israeli gunfire, the first death of a protester since Trump's dramatic midweek announcement. Two Palestinians were seriously wounded, health officials said.

Dozens of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza were hit by live rounds or rubber-coated steel or inhaled tear gas, the officials said.

Trump's pivot on Jerusalem triggered warnings from America's friends and foes alike that he is needlessly stirring more conflict in an already volatile region.

The religious and political dispute over Jerusalem forms the emotional core of the Israeli-Arab conflict. The ancient city is home to major Muslim, Jewish and Christian shrines and looms large in the competing national narratives of Israelis and Palestinians.

Trump's decision on Jerusalem is widely seen in the region as a blatant expression of pro-Israel bias, but it was unclear if protests and confrontations would maintain momentum after Friday. More extensive violence has erupted in the Palestinian areas in the past, including deadly bloodshed triggered by disputes over Jerusalem.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' Fatah movement and other groups had called for three "days of rage" this week. However, Abbas remains an opponent of violence, saying it's counterproductive and that he might at some point order his security forces to contain protests.

Separately, Fatah's rival, the Gaza-based Islamic militant Hamas, called this week for a third uprising against Israel, but such appeals have fizzled as Palestinians become more disillusioned with their leaders.

On Friday, demonstrators in the West Bank torched heaps of tires, sending columns of thick black smoke rising over the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem. Palestinian stone-throwers traded volleys in the streets with soldiers firing tear gas and rubber bullets. Along the Gaza-Israel border fence, Israeli troops fired at stone-throwers.

Across the region — from Asia's Indonesia, Malaysia and Pakistan to North Africa's Algeria and Lebanon in the Levant — thousands of worshippers poured into the streets after midday prayers to voice their anger. Some protesters burned U.S. and Israeli flags or stomped Trump posters that showed the president alongside a Nazi swastika.

In Jordan's capital of Amman, thousands marched through the center of town, chanting "America is the head of the snake."

Pro-Western Jordan is a crucial U.S. ally in the fight against Islamic extremists, but King Abdullah II cannot afford to be seen as soft on Jerusalem. His Hashemite dynasty derives its legitimacy from its role as guardian of the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, Islam's third-holiest site.

Trump's decision has also strained U.S. foreign relations.

U.N. Mideast envoy Nickolay Mladenov told an emergency session of the U.N. Security Council on Friday that Trump's announcement created a "serious risk" of a chain of unilateral actions that would push the goal of peace further away.

Palestinian U.N. Ambassador Riyad Mansour warned of the danger of "a never-ending religious war that will only be exploited by extremists, fueling more radicalism, violence and strife in the region and elsewhere."

Even traditional U.S. allies sharply criticized Trump's decision.

Sweden's U.N. Ambassador Olof Skoog said the U.S. action "contradicts international law and Security Council resolutions." Britain's Ambassador Matthew Rycroft called the U.S. decision "unhelpful to peace," the French envoy expressed regret and Italy's Sebastiano Cardi warned of "the risk of unrest and tensions in the region."

The U.S. ambassador, Nikki Haley, told the council that the Trump administration is more committed to peace "than we've ever been before — and we believe we might be closer to that goal than ever before." Haley did not explain.

In Europe, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Friday played down the impact of Trump's policy shift, which also included a pledge to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Tillerson said it will likely take years for the U.S. to open an embassy in Jerusalem.

In a news conference with the French foreign minister, Tillerson said Trump's recognition of the city as Israel's capital "did not indicate any final status for Jerusalem."

The United States is making clear that Jerusalem's borders will be left to Israelis and Palestinians to "negotiate and decide," he said.

Most countries around the world have not recognized Israel's 1967 annexation of east Jerusalem and maintain their embassies in Tel Aviv. Under a longstanding international consensus, the fate of the city is to be determined in negotiations.

Trump's announcement delivered a blow to Abbas, a supporter of the idea of reaching Palestinian statehood through U.S.-led negotiations with Israel. In siding with Israel on Jerusalem, he has said, the Trump administration effectively disqualified itself as a mediator.

However, Abbas has not decided how to move forward, including whether he will rule out future U.S.-brokered negotiations. Trump has said he still intends to propose a Mideast peace deal.

More than two decades of intermittent Israeli-Palestinian negotiations have failed to bring the Palestinians closer to statehood. Some in Abbas' inner circle say the old paradigm, with the U.S. serving as mediator, is no longer relevant.

On Thursday, a senior Fatah official said the Palestinians would not receive Vice President Mike Pence when he visits the West Bank later this month, but it was not immediately clear if the official spoke for Abbas.

The Arab League, an umbrella group of close to two dozen states, is to meet Saturday to try to forge a joint position, followed next week by a gathering in Turkey of the 57-state Organization of Islamic Cooperation.

Turkish officials said Russian President Vladimir Putin will travel to Turkey next week for talks with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Jerusalem's status and other issues.

___

Laub reported from Jericho, West Bank. Associated Press writers Fares Akram in Gaza City, Mohammed Daraghmeh in Ramallah, Alice Su in Amman, Jordan, and Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations also contributed to this report.

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GM will soon let you order Starbucks while driving

Daniel HowleyTechnology Editor

General Motors (GM) wants to help you get your favorite cup of coffee faster with its new Marketplace platform. Available for eligible Cadillac, Chevy, Buick and GMC vehicles, Marketplace lets you order your venti mocha latte with a double shot of espresso right from your car’s touchscreen.

Marketplace, which GM says will roll out alongside a host of other interface updates for its vehicles throughout the next 12 to 18 months, will use your vehicle’s built-in 4G LTE connection to connect to different retailers and purchase items ranging from a cup of joe to gas to your favorite food at Applebee’s.

Interestingly, GM says Marketplace will let you make purchases while driving using your car’s touchscreen. Most automakers seemingly prevent you from doing most anything having to do with apps while behind the wheel.

Marketplace doesn’t offer voice support yet, so you can’t order your coffee by telling your car to get you a large with cream and five Splenda packets just yet.

A GM representative said Marketplace was tested and validated by GM to be safe to use while driving.

The automaker has released a list of 12 different retailers that will offer some form of compatibility with Marketplace. Starbucks (SBUX) and Dunkin’ Donuts (DNKN) integration will allow you to order your favorite drink or “food item” from your car and then pick it up in the store or at the drive-through.

Applebee’s and IHOP (DIN) will let you search for their nearest locations and reserve tables. TGI Fridays will also let you reserve tables for your group, while Wingstop will let you reorder your favorite foods from your car.

ExxonMobil (XOM) and Shell (RDS-A) integration will help you find nearby gas stations. In fact, Shell’s service will let you pay for fuel from within your vehicle.

A GM-specific offering, meanwhile, will let you do things like top off your 4G LTE data pool from your car. It’s important to note that Marketplace doesn’t require you to sign up for a separate LTE plan.

Outside of simply being able to order drinks or food directly, Marketplace learns your habits and preferences, so eventually it will be able to suggest that you visit certain stores based on the hour of the day and where you’re driving.

That’s a convenient feature, but it’s sure to raise concerns from privacy advocates.

Either way, it will be interesting to see if more retailers jump on board with Marketplace. Something about demanding that my car buy me a Dairy Queen (BRKA) Blizzard without having to wait in line sounds irresistible.

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